Contact Information

The Next Hour Neuchâtel
Fbg de l’Hôpital 78
2000 Neuchâtel
SWITZERLAND

Launching the pilot program TikTok Resumes throughout July, the globally established app that forced the world to diversify its digital strategies is evolving once more to help Generation Z combat a stifling job market. 

No one watches one video on TikTok. If you’ve done so, your will power is credible. For the rest of us, sucked into the hypnotic void of audiovisual delight where hours flicker by like seconds on the clock, short bursts of life captured in short films against memorable songs. Love it or hate it, TikTok has barged its way into the mainstream of cultural conversation. From the mirror washing ‘wipe it down’ sensation, becoming the main character to teens disguised as their grandma to buy alcohol. It’s the internet, anything goes.

The hypnotism of TikTok and the importance of Gen Z

Throughout global quarantine, TikTok trends punctuated the grey days of isolation but as we emerge from the cruel wrath of the virus and begin to look forward to life beyond the virus, it’s clear that TikTok is here to stay. And on TikTok, there’s a place for everyone. You can partake, or observe, curate your own identity or become fascinated by those of others. An emphasis on accessibility also means that within a matter of hours, TikTok fame can happen to anyone going from a mere amount of followers to thousands in days. They become a global spectacle from their bedrooms. While the levity of fame is never quite certain, the app that provides it isn’t going anywhere soon as teens continue to document the ebb and flow of coming of age

Yet it’s not all a laughing matter. For these digital natives articulating their livelihoods and identities online, the platform is taking on a new momentum. The visual portfolios that document the nuances of character are steadily evolving into character resumes, and garnering the attention of employers. As the scope of this social app broadens, users who have been faced with a notoriously sterile job market throughout the pandemic are creating video applications under the hashtag #TikTokResume.

Yet it’s not all a laughing matter. For these digital natives articulating their livelihoods and identities online, the platform is taking on a new momentum. The visual portfolios that document the nuances of character are steadily evolving into character resumes, and garnering the attention of employers. As the scope of ths social app broadens, users who who have been faced with a notoriously sterile job market throughout the pandemic are creating video applications under the hashtag #TikTokResume.

The digital landscape is creating educational shifts in society

To assist in the campaign, TikTok launched Tiktokresumes.com encouraging budding applicants to search job openings, post a video on the app and then submit. In its early phase of adaptation, and only currently available to those in the US, TikTok is teaming up with brands to accept digital pitches and applications as part of their hiring process. With Shopify, NBA, Sony Music and Abercrombie & Fitch Co. joining the first cohort of brands to accept this new genre of solicitation, the pilot program aims to loosen the strictures of a tense job market.

At this point, you might be thinking of Elle Woods’ iconic hot tub video application into Harvard Law School and the precariousness of setting yourself for rejection through visual prejudice. But on the contrary, this novel genre of verbal essays allows users to reveal their personality and pitch themselves beyond a list of academic qualifications on paper. 

While it might be an unexpected union between a recreational playground and a world of formality, it represents a natural evolution of society’s integration of technological capabilities and the importance of social media, when at its best. Instead, it cuts through the hackneyed jargon of cover letters and the formality of LinkedIn that provides a rigid structure to sell yourself. This entrepreneurial shift allows Generation Z and Millenials, ardent in expression, to truly curate and display their personality, rather than be defined by grades and marks. Instead, it opens the door to diversify and accommodate more voices that deserve to be heard in the hiring process. 

Share:

Scarlett is a writer, editor, and creative consultant specializing in art, fashion, culture and digital strategy. Drawing on her work from previous titles including Dazed, LOVE Magazine, The Perfect Magazine, AnOther and 1 Granary, as the Editor-in-Chief of The Next Hour, Scarlett is leading the editorial vision toward new territories providing an alternative lens of social commentary to recontextualize the world of watchmaking for the next generation.